Best o/t Web 28 Feb 10

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:: Writer Laeta Kalogridis of Shutter Island’s advice: “Live within your means.”
:: An endless curiosity: the processes of other writers.
:: 12 step plan for getting published.
:: Screenwriter Sheldon Turner in the Dialogue Series, a focus on the craft.
:: Creating romantic chemistry between your characters.
:: Your first script will always stink.
:: Picking your direction, what’s your tone of choice?
:: Breaking it down: the three-act eight sequence structure.
:: The three S’s: sight, sound, smell. Put them in your script.
:: Can you get away with basing your character on a real person?
:: The mantra: watch movies, read screenplays, write pages.

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With thanks to Sol.

Feel free to give your feedback in the Questions and Comments below.

Enjoy!

Karel


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4 thoughts on “Best o/t Web 28 Feb 10”

  1. I confess to being a little perplexed by the “three S’s” article. We’re putting “smells” in screenplays now? How’s that work out exactly? And the suggested use of songs titles by little known Swedish bands? And flowery adjectives? Unless it’s critical for the story, surely an apple’s an apple, no?

    Strange article …

    Reply
    • (LOL)

      Admitted, without Julie’s full explanation it doesn’t seem to make much sense.

      As a rule: what the audience can’t see or hear should not be in the screenplay.

      But Julie knows what she’s talking about so there must be a good reason for it.

      Reply
      • I’m not sure I endorse the logic in your last line lol

        The whole thing, apple and all, smells to high heaven!

        Seriously though, even if it is out of context, it’s a “dangerous” article if anyone, not knowing any better, takes it as gospel. Shiny, fragrant, blood red apples could abound …

        Reply
        • You win.

          Was talking to a friend the other day and I brought up Julie’s article. He thought the current trend in screenwriting is exactly the opposite: tight, fast, economical.

          I think the technique Julie mentions is effective only in a very few scenes of most screenplays.

          Reply

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